Fixed several bad links in Luke #2170

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lrsallee merged 1 commits from luk_bp into master 6 months ago
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      en_tn_43-LUK.tsv

4
en_tn_43-LUK.tsv

@ -3464,7 +3464,7 @@ LUK 20 9 y37s γεωργοῖς 1 farmers While **farmers** is a general term f
LUK 20 10 wm51 figs-explicit καιρῷ 1 at the time If it would be helpful to your readers, you could say more explicitly what time this was. Alternate translation: “at the time at which they had agreed to give him a share of the crop” or “at harvest time” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-explicit]])
LUK 20 10 m361 γεωργοὺς…γεωργοὶ 1 farmers … farmers See how you translated **farmers** in [20:9](../20/09.md). Alternate translation: “vine growers” or “grape farmers”
LUK 20 10 kr7j figs-metaphor ἀπὸ τοῦ καρποῦ τοῦ ἀμπελῶνος 1 of the fruit of the vineyard The word **fruit** could be: (1) intended literally. Alternate translation: “some of the grapes they had grown” (2) figurative. Alternate translation: “some of what they had produced from the grapes they had grown” or “some of the money they had earned by selling their produce” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-metaphor]])
LUK 20 10 m362 figs-explicit οἱ…γεωργοὶ ἐξαπέστειλαν αὐτὸν, δείραντες κενόν 1 the farmers sent him away, having beaten him, empty It may be helpful to state explicitly that the farmers did this after the servant arrived, as UST does. (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/ttranslate/figs-explicit]])
LUK 20 10 m362 figs-explicit οἱ…γεωργοὶ ἐξαπέστειλαν αὐτὸν, δείραντες κενόν 1 the farmers sent him away, having beaten him, empty It may be helpful to state explicitly that the farmers did this after the servant arrived, as UST does. (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-explicit]])
LUK 20 10 isk1 figs-metaphor ἐξαπέστειλαν αὐτὸν…κενόν 1 sent him away empty Jesus speaks figuratively of this servant as if he were a container with nothing in it. Alternate translation: “sent him away without giving him anything” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-metaphor]])
LUK 20 11 r72a ἀτιμάσαντες 1 treated him shamefully Alternate translation: “humiliated him”
LUK 20 11 vxh2 figs-metaphor ἐξαπέστειλαν κενόν 1 sent him away empty See how you translated this in [20:10](../20/10.md). Alternate translation: “sent him away without giving him anything” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-metaphor]])
@ -4286,7 +4286,7 @@ LUK 23 56 mj6q figs-explicit ἡτοίμασαν ἀρώματα καὶ μύρ
LUK 23 56 m681 translate-unknown ἀρώματα καὶ μύρα 1 spices and ointments The **spices** were sweet-smelling substances that were dry, and the **ointments** were sweet-smelling substances that were moist. If your readers would not be familiar with **spices and ointments**, you could use a general expression. Alternate translation: “sweet-smelling substances” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/translate-unknown]])
LUK 23 56 uzk9 ἡσύχασαν 1 they rested Alternate translation: “the women did not do any work”
LUK 23 56 tk6s κατὰ τὴν ἐντολήν 1 according to the commandment Alternate translation: “as Moses had commanded in the law”
LUK 24 intro r5qx 0 # Luke 24 General Notes<br><br>## Structure and formatting<br><br>1. The women go to Jesus’ tomb and find it empty (24:1-12)<br>2. Two disciples meet Jesus on a journey to Emmaus (24:13-35)<br>3. Jesus, risen from the dead, appears to his disciples (24:36-53)<br><br>## Special concepts in this chapter<br><br>### The loyalty of the women<br><br>Many of Luke’s original readers would have thought that women were less important than men. But Luke carefully demonstrates that some women who loved Jesus very much showed him greater loyalty than the twelve disciples did. While the disciples ran away and hid, the women lovingly cared for Jesus’ body, and as a result, they were the first to learn that he had risen from the dead.<br><br>### Resurrection<br><br>Luke wants his readers to understand that Jesus came alive again in a physical body ([Luke 24:38-43](../24/38.md)).<br><br>## Other possible translation difficulties in this chapter<br><br>### “the third day”<br><br>This expression occurs three times in this chapter, in [24:7](../24/07.md), [24:21](../24/21.md), and [24:46](../24/46.md). See the explanation of this expression in the note to Luke [18:33](../18/33.md). In the idiom of this culture, today was the “first day,” tomorrow was the “second day,” and the day after tomorrow was the “third day.” By that way of reckoning time, since Jesus died on a Friday, when he rose from the dead on a Sunday, that was the “third day.”<br><br>### Two men in bright shining robes<br><br>Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John all write about angels in white clothing speaking with the women at Jesus’ tomb. Matthew and John call them angels, while Mark and Luke call them men, but that is only because the angels appeared in human form. Luke and John write about both angels, while Matthew and Mark write about only one of them. It would be best to translate each of these passages as it appears in ULT without trying to make the passages all say exactly the same thing. (See: [Matthew 28:1-2](../../mat/28/01.md) and [Mark 16:5](../../mrk/16/05.md) and [Luke 24:4](../../luk/24/04.md) and [John 20:12](../../jhn/20/12.md))
LUK 24 intro r5qx 0 # Luke 24 General Notes<br><br>## Structure and formatting<br><br>1. The women go to Jesus’ tomb and find it empty (24:1-12)<br>2. Two disciples meet Jesus on a journey to Emmaus (24:13-35)<br>3. Jesus, risen from the dead, appears to his disciples (24:36-53)<br><br>## Special concepts in this chapter<br><br>### The loyalty of the women<br><br>Many of Luke’s original readers would have thought that women were less important than men. But Luke carefully demonstrates that some women who loved Jesus very much showed him greater loyalty than the twelve disciples did. While the disciples ran away and hid, the women lovingly cared for Jesus’ body, and as a result, they were the first to learn that he had risen from the dead.<br><br>### Resurrection<br><br>Luke wants his readers to understand that Jesus came alive again in a physical body ([Luke 24:38-43](../24/38.md)).<br><br>## Other possible translation difficulties in this chapter<br><br>### “the third day”<br><br>This expression occurs three times in this chapter, in [24:7](../24/07.md), [24:21](../24/21.md), and [24:46](../24/46.md). See the explanation of this expression in the note to Luke [18:33](../18/33.md). In the idiom of this culture, today was the “first day,” tomorrow was the “second day,” and the day after tomorrow was the “third day.” By that way of reckoning time, since Jesus died on a Friday, when he rose from the dead on a Sunday, that was the “third day.”<br><br>### Two men in bright shining robes<br><br>Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John all write about angels in white clothing speaking with the women at Jesus’ tomb. Matthew and John call them angels, while Mark and Luke call them men, but that is only because the angels appeared in human form. Luke and John write about both angels, while Matthew and Mark write about only one of them. It would be best to translate each of these passages as it appears in ULT without trying to make the passages all say exactly the same thing. (See: [Matthew 28:1-2](../mat/28/01.md) and [Mark 16:5](../mrk/16/05.md) and [Luke 24:4](../luk/24/04.md) and [John 20:12](../jhn/20/12.md))
LUK 24 1 m682 figs-explicit τῇ…μιᾷ τῶν σαββάτων 1 on the first of the week This implicitly means the **first** day of the week. Alternate translation: “on the first day of the week” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-explicit]])
LUK 24 1 r62f translate-ordinal τῇ…μιᾷ τῶν σαββάτων 1 on the first of the week Here Luke is actually using a cardinal number, “one,” to mean **first**. If your language does not use ordinal numbers, you can also use a cardinal number here in your translation. Alternate translation: “on day one of the week” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/translate-ordinal]])
LUK 24 1 m683 figs-idiom ὄρθρου βαθέως 1 deeply at dawn This is an idiom. Alternate translation: “at the first light of dawn” or “as dawn was just beginning to break” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-idiom]])

1 Book Chapter Verse ID SupportReference OrigQuote Occurrence GLQuote OccurrenceNote
3464 LUK 20 10 wm51 figs-explicit καιρῷ 1 at the time If it would be helpful to your readers, you could say more explicitly what time this was. Alternate translation: “at the time at which they had agreed to give him a share of the crop” or “at harvest time” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-explicit]])
3465 LUK 20 10 m361 γεωργοὺς…γεωργοὶ 1 farmers … farmers See how you translated **farmers** in [20:9](../20/09.md). Alternate translation: “vine growers” or “grape farmers”
3466 LUK 20 10 kr7j figs-metaphor ἀπὸ τοῦ καρποῦ τοῦ ἀμπελῶνος 1 of the fruit of the vineyard The word **fruit** could be: (1) intended literally. Alternate translation: “some of the grapes they had grown” (2) figurative. Alternate translation: “some of what they had produced from the grapes they had grown” or “some of the money they had earned by selling their produce” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-metaphor]])
3467 LUK 20 10 m362 figs-explicit οἱ…γεωργοὶ ἐξαπέστειλαν αὐτὸν, δείραντες κενόν 1 the farmers sent him away, having beaten him, empty It may be helpful to state explicitly that the farmers did this after the servant arrived, as UST does. (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/ttranslate/figs-explicit]]) It may be helpful to state explicitly that the farmers did this after the servant arrived, as UST does. (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-explicit]])
3468 LUK 20 10 isk1 figs-metaphor ἐξαπέστειλαν αὐτὸν…κενόν 1 sent him away empty Jesus speaks figuratively of this servant as if he were a container with nothing in it. Alternate translation: “sent him away without giving him anything” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-metaphor]])
3469 LUK 20 11 r72a ἀτιμάσαντες 1 treated him shamefully Alternate translation: “humiliated him”
3470 LUK 20 11 vxh2 figs-metaphor ἐξαπέστειλαν κενόν 1 sent him away empty See how you translated this in [20:10](../20/10.md). Alternate translation: “sent him away without giving him anything” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-metaphor]])
4286 LUK 23 56 m681 translate-unknown ἀρώματα καὶ μύρα 1 spices and ointments The **spices** were sweet-smelling substances that were dry, and the **ointments** were sweet-smelling substances that were moist. If your readers would not be familiar with **spices and ointments**, you could use a general expression. Alternate translation: “sweet-smelling substances” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/translate-unknown]])
4287 LUK 23 56 uzk9 ἡσύχασαν 1 they rested Alternate translation: “the women did not do any work”
4288 LUK 23 56 tk6s κατὰ τὴν ἐντολήν 1 according to the commandment Alternate translation: “as Moses had commanded in the law”
4289 LUK 24 intro r5qx 0 # Luke 24 General Notes<br><br>## Structure and formatting<br><br>1. The women go to Jesus’ tomb and find it empty (24:1-12)<br>2. Two disciples meet Jesus on a journey to Emmaus (24:13-35)<br>3. Jesus, risen from the dead, appears to his disciples (24:36-53)<br><br>## Special concepts in this chapter<br><br>### The loyalty of the women<br><br>Many of Luke’s original readers would have thought that women were less important than men. But Luke carefully demonstrates that some women who loved Jesus very much showed him greater loyalty than the twelve disciples did. While the disciples ran away and hid, the women lovingly cared for Jesus’ body, and as a result, they were the first to learn that he had risen from the dead.<br><br>### Resurrection<br><br>Luke wants his readers to understand that Jesus came alive again in a physical body ([Luke 24:38-43](../24/38.md)).<br><br>## Other possible translation difficulties in this chapter<br><br>### “the third day”<br><br>This expression occurs three times in this chapter, in [24:7](../24/07.md), [24:21](../24/21.md), and [24:46](../24/46.md). See the explanation of this expression in the note to Luke [18:33](../18/33.md). In the idiom of this culture, today was the “first day,” tomorrow was the “second day,” and the day after tomorrow was the “third day.” By that way of reckoning time, since Jesus died on a Friday, when he rose from the dead on a Sunday, that was the “third day.”<br><br>### Two men in bright shining robes<br><br>Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John all write about angels in white clothing speaking with the women at Jesus’ tomb. Matthew and John call them angels, while Mark and Luke call them men, but that is only because the angels appeared in human form. Luke and John write about both angels, while Matthew and Mark write about only one of them. It would be best to translate each of these passages as it appears in ULT without trying to make the passages all say exactly the same thing. (See: [Matthew 28:1-2](../../mat/28/01.md) and [Mark 16:5](../../mrk/16/05.md) and [Luke 24:4](../../luk/24/04.md) and [John 20:12](../../jhn/20/12.md)) # Luke 24 General Notes<br><br>## Structure and formatting<br><br>1. The women go to Jesus’ tomb and find it empty (24:1-12)<br>2. Two disciples meet Jesus on a journey to Emmaus (24:13-35)<br>3. Jesus, risen from the dead, appears to his disciples (24:36-53)<br><br>## Special concepts in this chapter<br><br>### The loyalty of the women<br><br>Many of Luke’s original readers would have thought that women were less important than men. But Luke carefully demonstrates that some women who loved Jesus very much showed him greater loyalty than the twelve disciples did. While the disciples ran away and hid, the women lovingly cared for Jesus’ body, and as a result, they were the first to learn that he had risen from the dead.<br><br>### Resurrection<br><br>Luke wants his readers to understand that Jesus came alive again in a physical body ([Luke 24:38-43](../24/38.md)).<br><br>## Other possible translation difficulties in this chapter<br><br>### “the third day”<br><br>This expression occurs three times in this chapter, in [24:7](../24/07.md), [24:21](../24/21.md), and [24:46](../24/46.md). See the explanation of this expression in the note to Luke [18:33](../18/33.md). In the idiom of this culture, today was the “first day,” tomorrow was the “second day,” and the day after tomorrow was the “third day.” By that way of reckoning time, since Jesus died on a Friday, when he rose from the dead on a Sunday, that was the “third day.”<br><br>### Two men in bright shining robes<br><br>Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John all write about angels in white clothing speaking with the women at Jesus’ tomb. Matthew and John call them angels, while Mark and Luke call them men, but that is only because the angels appeared in human form. Luke and John write about both angels, while Matthew and Mark write about only one of them. It would be best to translate each of these passages as it appears in ULT without trying to make the passages all say exactly the same thing. (See: [Matthew 28:1-2](../mat/28/01.md) and [Mark 16:5](../mrk/16/05.md) and [Luke 24:4](../luk/24/04.md) and [John 20:12](../jhn/20/12.md))
4290 LUK 24 1 m682 figs-explicit τῇ…μιᾷ τῶν σαββάτων 1 on the first of the week This implicitly means the **first** day of the week. Alternate translation: “on the first day of the week” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-explicit]])
4291 LUK 24 1 r62f translate-ordinal τῇ…μιᾷ τῶν σαββάτων 1 on the first of the week Here Luke is actually using a cardinal number, “one,” to mean **first**. If your language does not use ordinal numbers, you can also use a cardinal number here in your translation. Alternate translation: “on day one of the week” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/translate-ordinal]])
4292 LUK 24 1 m683 figs-idiom ὄρθρου βαθέως 1 deeply at dawn This is an idiom. Alternate translation: “at the first light of dawn” or “as dawn was just beginning to break” (See: [[rc://en/ta/man/translate/figs-idiom]])
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